Reader Mailbag #8

Dustyn, on Twitter, asks:

Hey, Josh, what do you like to do to get you in the mood for writing 40k? Any stories, movies, music, or shows just pump you up for writing in the setting and set you in the right headspace?

Good question!

And the answer is – not a blessed thing.

Or, rather, nothing specific. I tend to find inspiration in music, but never anything in particular. I don’t have a set 40K playlist, for instance. Generally it’ll be whatever music I’m listening to at the time, which varies depending on my mood at the moment. I wrote one book listening almost exclusively to Earth, Wind and Fire’s greatest hits, for instance.

Now, once inspiration hits, I often assemble a rough and ready playlist from the songs that I find myself listening to on repeat at that particular moment. Such playlists might only have three or four songs, or it might have fifteen or twenty. Again, it depends on my mood.

I’ve made some of these playlists available for folks to peruse, if they’re interested.

Time and Again

There’s a new story available for patrons at my Patreon – “Ouroboros” is a bit of dystopian science-horror by way of Lovecraft. It takes place during the final hours of humanity’s final redoubt, as it crumbles before the onslaughts of the Crawling Chaos.

It’s also a sequel of sorts to “Eliza”, which is available to read over at the Lovecraft eZine. Why not go read that one for free, and then check out “Ouroboros” for a buck. And afterwards, why not take a look at some of the other stories available at the Patreon?

Reader Mailbag #7

Scott Harper asks:

Is there any chance the Blood Dragon novel will ever be printed in any form?

Short answer: no.

Long answer: It is unlikely for a number of reasons. The foremost being because it never actually got past the pitch stage, due to scheduling conflicts with the End Times material. Essentially, the End Times happened and any Warhammer Fantasy novel that hadn’t already been contracted was never going to be.

Another reason is almost certainly the relatively poor sales of Master of Death. While Neferata earned out its advance fairly quickly, the sequel did surprisingly poorly.  Master of Death suffered a death of a thousand cuts, the most grievous of which were likely the sudden change in format from paperback to trade, as well as the utter lack of marketing it received upon its release.

Regardless the combination of timing and sales effectively killed any chance Blood Dragon had of being commissioned, or of an omnibus being assembled.

tldr; sometimes vampires don’t rise from the grave.